Back To: Home

CLICK HERE FOR WHAT'S NEW IN:
 




 

Progress for pain-killer problems
November 2015
SHARING OPTIONS:

JUPITER, Fla.—A recent study out of the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) led by Associate Prof. Kirill Martemyanov has identified a specific molecule that controls morphine receptor signaling in a small group of brain cells—a discovery that, it's hoped, could lead to a new drug target for less-addictive pain drugs and possibly insight into the genetic predisposition of addiction. The molecule is a regulator of G protein signaling (RGS), which controls the morphine receptor (mu opioid receptor). In animal models that lacked the RGS protein RGS7, the team found that eliminating the protein enhanced reward, increased pain relief, delayed tolerance and heightened withdrawal in response to self-administered morphine doses, demonstrating that without the protein, the animals were predisposed to morphine addiction. The protein is thought to work by regulating morphine-induced changes in the excitability of neurons and plasticity of synapses.

Back



PAGE UTILITIES


CONTACT US
DDNEWS
Published by Old River Publications LLC
19035 Old Detroit Road
Rocky River, OH USA 44116
Ph: 440-331-6600  |  Fax: 440-331-7563
 
© Copyright 2017 Old River Publications LLC. All righs reserved.  |  Web site managed and designed by OffWhite.