Back To: Home

CLICK HERE FOR WHAT'S NEW IN:
 




 

Checking out chemoimmunotherapy
June 2015
SHARING OPTIONS:

SAN DIEGO—A team from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has discovered that blocking or removing the immune-suppressing cells accumulated by large prostate tumors—immunosuppressive B cells, which suppress the immune response and are found in several cancers—enables a certain type of chemotherapy, and the immune cells it activates, to destroy the tumors. This approach, coined chemoimmunotherapy, resulted in near-complete remission in mouse models of advanced prostate cancer. The researchers worked with three mouse models of advanced cancer, all of which were resistant to low doses of oxaliplatin. When the development or function of immunosuppressive B cells was blocked, or the cells removed, before treatment with oxaliplatin, the mice’s immune cells almost entirely wiped out the tumors. Similar results were seen when oxaliplatin was combined with a checkpoint inhibitor.

Back



PAGE UTILITIES


CONTACT US
DDNEWS
Published by Old River Publications LLC
19035 Old Detroit Road
Rocky River, OH USA 44116
Ph: 440-331-6600  |  Fax: 440-331-7563
 
© Copyright 2017 Old River Publications LLC. All righs reserved.  |  Web site managed and designed by OffWhite.